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Archive for January, 2004

Journalling

Saturday, January 31st, 2004

Following on from the Moleskinerie contest, this week’s spotlight is on Danny Gregory’s blog, Everyday Matters.

I’ve kept journals in the past. On that lovely squared paper bought on exchange visits in France. Growing up in a household of boys I wrote in French to avoid prying eyes. Rather than sketching, I would glue bits and pieces straight on to the pages. I knitted a jumper once (a hideous black and pink mohair monstrosity). In went strands of the wool. We went to see (the then very funny) Max Boyce in concert on my fifteenth birthday. In went the ticket and the autographed photo. I also used to make travel scrapbooks, adding postcards, ticket stubs, menus, coasters… No wonder I like blogging so much.

Then I got the iPAQ and tried to wean myself off the paper fetish. But five years later and I’m drifting back to paper notebooks. There is nothing quite like the feel of a good quality paper that has been written on both sides.

And now that I’ve drooled over Danny’s site, my eyes are wandering over to the cupboard where I keep a secret stash of notebooks, colouring pencils and of course a supply of purple pens. And I’m itching to get writing and glueing. Dammit.

What happened here?

Saturday, January 31st, 2004

who130.jpg

*Big sigh.* If you don’t do something as soon as you think of it, someone else is going to do that something. And do it better than you could ever hope to.

Moleskinerie has an intriguing contest. See that picture? Study it closely. And answer the question ~ what happened here? The best explanation to this mystery wins a copy of Everyday Matters by Danny Gregory.

Now where did I put my deerstalker

The BBC

Friday, January 30th, 2004

No time for a post but do go read Bloggerheads’ I believe in the BBC, this and then this (I don’t think that last link will be there for long). [Via Blogged.]

Telemarketer revenge

Thursday, January 29th, 2004

Melissa has a great link to a financial advice website that has asked readers submit their favourite telemarketer revenge stories.

Here are the top ten so far:

“I can’t believe you got this number so quickly. I got out of prison yesterday. You know what I was in for? Selling telemarketers’ personal information to people that do bad things to them. Can I get you to stay on the line for just about thirty five more seconds while this thing downloads your cubicle location and headset I.D.?” or “This call will be recorded for quality assurance.”

If you have caller ID, when you pick up the phone say, “Hello this is Buddy the elf.” Then talk really fast so they can’t understand you when you say, “Loser says what?”

If you have caller ID, say, “Trixie’s Call Girl Service. Press ‘one’ for an appointment. Press ‘two’ if you are seeking employment. Press ‘three’ if you are a law enforcement officer.”

A reader from Sydney, Australia wrote about his revenge on a telemarketer selling aluminum siding.

“We were forever getting calls to clad (add siding to) our home. In the end, I was really cheesed off so under duress I made an appointment for a rep to come and give me a quote. When he arrived and found my home was of brick construction he virtually went through the roof, but on settling down he asked why I had accepted the offer of a quote. I said, being sick of calls from his company, I decided to accept their offer. That was the last call we had for aluminum cladding.”

(more…)

Undercover journalists

Thursday, January 29th, 2004

have just revealed the latest police funding scheme.

[Via non blogging Brian]

Comment shyness

Thursday, January 29th, 2004

Does anyone else get that? You read a cracking post, hover for a while but click away before commenting?

Here’s a sample of where I’ve been hovering and not always commenting. But appreciating:

p.s. Could you email me if you were worried about a post elsewhere regarding the Chinese? I’d like to discuss it off-line. Or off-blog. Because it would still be on-line. Obviously.

Humungous URLs

Thursday, January 29th, 2004

You all know about creating a tiny url, yes? It allows you to create a smaller URL from a much longer one.

Well some joker has created the opposite: huge url. So chasingdaisy becomes a catchy little 15,000+ character url. Heh.

[Via Langa List and Mike’s List.]

Question Time

Thursday, January 29th, 2004

George W Bush goes to a primary school to talk about the war. After his talk he invites questions. One little boy puts up his hand, and the President asks him his name.
“Billy!”
“And what is your question, Billy?”
“I have three questions,” says the boy. “First – why did the USA invade Iraq without the support of the UN?; Second – why are you President when Al Gore got more votes?; and Third – whatever happened to Osama bin Laden?”
Just then the bell rings for recess. George W Bush informs the children that they will continue after recess. When they resume, the President says:
“Okay, where were we? Oh that’s right, question time. Who has a question?”
(more…)

Lunch at noon

Thursday, January 29th, 2004

Graeme has discovered a wonderful food site, not just for the recipes (I’m printing and planning as we speak) but the design: Lunch at Noon by Design at Noon.

Two “science” links in one week?

Wednesday, January 28th, 2004

Blame Karan for this one.

Within a few years we could be using genetically engineered plants to warn of landmines:

The genetically modified weed has been coded to change color when its roots come in contact with nitrogen-dioxide (NO2) evaporating from explosives buried in soil.

Within three to six weeks from being sowed over land mine infested areas the small plant, order a Thale Cress, will turn a warning red whenever close to a land mine.

According to data compiled by Aresa, more than 100 million land mines have been spread out in 45 countries, hidden killers that often remain for years after a conflict is over.

Oestergaard said the problem of sowing the seeds in a potential land mine could be overcome by clearing strips through a field by conventional methods or by using crop planes.

Currently land mines are mostly removed by putting a stick into the ground to locate the mine, then removing it and detonating it. Dogs and metal detectors are also often used.

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