home

Quote of the day, #39

I made the mistake* of reading George Orwell‘s A Clergyman’s Daughter this week (having come across an online pdf version at Bookyards).

So, just ten days after her arrest for begging, Dorothy set out for Ringwood House Academy, Brough Road, Southbridge, with a small trunk decently full of clothes and four pounds ten in her purse— for Sir Thomas had made her a present of ten pounds. When she thought of the ease with which this job had been found for her, and then of the miserable struggles of three weeks ago, the contrast amazed her. It brought home to her, as never before, the mysterious power of money. In fact, it reminded her of a favourite saying of Mr Warburton’s, that if you took 1 Corinthians, chapter thirteen, and in every verse wrote ‘money’ instead of ‘charity’, the chapter had ten times as much meaning as before.

The original version of 1 Corinthians, chapter 13

1 Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.

2 And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.

3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.

4 Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up,

5 Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil;

6 Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth;

7 Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.

8 Charity never faileth: but whether there be prophecies, they shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away.

9 For we know in part, and we prophesy in part.

10 But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away.

11 When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.

12 For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.

13 And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these is charity.

And via the magic of search and replace, a version with the word charity replaced with money

1 Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not money, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.

2 And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not money, I am nothing.

3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not money, it profiteth me nothing.

4 Money suffereth long, and is kind; money envieth not; money vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up,

5 Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil;

6 Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth;

7 Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.

8 Money never faileth: but whether there be prophecies, they shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away.

9 For we know in part, and we prophesy in part.

10 But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away.

11 When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.

12 For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.

13 And now abideth faith, hope, money, these three; but the greatest of these is money.

Hmm.

* It used to be one of my favourite books, I’ve read it many times over the years but this time around the loss of faith, the meanness of so many of the characters and most of all Dorothy’s plight throughout got to me as never before. You can read the novel here at Bookyards but to be honest, I would choose another novel unless you’re feeling unshakeably optimistic and upbeat.

9 Responses to “Quote of the day, #39”

  1. Gert
    September 16th, 2006 15:07
    1

    Isn’t that a bit like Margaret Thatcher’s interpretation of the Good Samaritan – he was only able to be so because he was rich…

  2. daisy
    September 16th, 2006 15:46
    2

    Via Google:

    “No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he’d only had good intentions – he had money, too.”

    Did she really say that? Why am I not surprised!

  3. Peacechick Mary
    September 16th, 2006 16:20
    3

    Other versions of the bible have replaced “charity” with “love”; either way, it makes a strong statement. Now if we could turn things around a bit and say, money without charity or money without love shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away. That sounds a better teaching. It doesn’t matter how much money you have, you are nothing without love/charity.

  4. Lionel
    September 16th, 2006 19:53
    4

    Surely the point should be that nobody would remember the Good Samaritan if everyone acted that way as a matter of course?

  5. Nancy
    September 17th, 2006 13:49
    5

    Thanks for the link to bookyard. Descent into the Maelstrom is a very sunny alternative to Orwell. :-)

  6. ally bean
    September 18th, 2006 22:35
    6

    fascinating.

  7. victor
    September 18th, 2006 23:55
    7

    Thankyou for your plug on Bookyards.

    Just for your info we are updating and editing Bookyards. More ebooks, videos, web links, and a news/blog aggregator.

  8. daisy
    September 19th, 2006 00:41
    8

    That’s great news Victor, thank you for letting us know.

  9. Richard
    September 23rd, 2006 11:22
    9

    The best thing about these quotes is the glorious language of the King James bible:

    “For now we see through a glass, darkly…”

Leave a Reply

For added zing, you can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

But you can also just type in the box and hit the Submit button. Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

Your email address is not displayed and will NEVER, EVER be shared with any other party. We hate spam mail as much as you do.

Spotlight on...

Delicious links

These links are updated frequently thoroughout the day. Should you miss any they're all stored on my Delicious pages.

What I'm listening to